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Welcome to installment 15 of our exclusive translation of the wonderful Czech genealogy and history article from 1878 and the wonderful, forward-looking editors of Amerikán Národní Kalendář!  Today we bring you SEVEN new communities across the state of Minnesota! 

We began this exclusive translation from 1878 with a primer on the world as it was in 1878.  Then in Installment#1 we ‘visited’ the states of Arkansas and California.  In Installment #2 it was on to Connecticut and the Dakota Territory.  In Installment #3 we began our tour of rural Illinois and Installment #4 concluded this tour of Illinois and we moved on to Iowa.  Installment #5 we continued with our travels in Iowa.  Installment #6 featured more towns and rural Czech communities in Iowa as did Installment #7 and Installment #8Installment #9 saw us complete the state of Iowa as well as begin our tour of the great state of Kansas.  Installment #10 included seven new Czech communities in Kansas and Installment #11 finished Kansas, included Massachusetts, and began Michigan.  Installment #12 featured six communities in Michigan, while Installment #13 finished Michigan with four communities and began the first two communities in Minnesota.  Installment #14 continued our Minnesota tour.  You can click on any of the links and catch up if  you missed any portion of this wonderful and exclusive Czech genealogy and history translation.

Enjoy!

Amerikán Národní Kalendář

Volume: II, Year: 1878, Pages: 97-108

STRUČNÁ STATISTIKA: Osad, míst a okresů ve Spojených Státech Čechy obydlených (Jak daleko nám bylo možno letos dopátrati se dál. Budoucího roku budeme pokračovat)

 BRIEF STATISTICS: Of settlements, towns and counties at United States, inhabited by Czechs (As far as we were able to find this year. Next year we will continue.)

1878 minnesota rural scene

Marysburg, Blue Earth County, has nine Czech families totaling forty-two persons.  All of them are farmers.  The first Czech, Fr. Brejha, settled here in 1861.  Recently five Czech families left the town moving farther west.

Millerville, Douglas County, had several Czech families at first, but only one stayed here while the rest of them moved farther to the west.

Minneapolis, Hennepin County, has among its 34,500 dwellers 163 Czechs (consisting of 33 families).  Two of them are shoemakers, one is a pastry cook, one is a turner, and the rest of them are farmers.  The very first Czech who settled here, in 1856, was a shoemaker, Jan Petras.  The Czechs here are mostly still poor, without any Czech organizations, church, or school.  The number of Czechs is still increasing here.

Minnetonka Mills, Hennepin County, has 68 Czech families.  Among there are two tailors and one bricklayer.  The rest of them are farmers.  The earliest settler here was a Czech, Jan Pesek, in 1849.  Then in 1855 came Jan Castek, Jos. Holasek, Filip Dominik, Jos. Bren, and Jos. Vakovsky.  The number of Czech settlers here is still increasing, but there is no kind of Czech social life here at all.

Montgomery  (Nove Budejovice), Le Sueur County, has about 160 Czech families.  The first of the Czech settlers was Fr. Mauser in 1846, followed by Jan Faktor in 1857 and Vojt. Dolejs also in 1857. There is a Czech organization – The Readers Society.  There is also a Czech church, the Church of Our Lady, what has 80 members.  Czech social life has started to wake up here.

Monticello, Wright County, has 15 Czech families, which includes one shoemaker, one tailor, and the rest of the Czechs are farmers.  The first Czech who settled here in 1857 was Martin Kotylinek.  The next one arrived in 1866 and was Jos. Novotny.  Then in 1869 came Albert Kotilinek, and then more.

Nova Praha, Scott and Le Sueur Counties, is a pure Czech town with 1,000 dwellers.  In the town are 30 Czech stores and workshops and in its surroundings about 400 farmers.  There are also seven innkeepers, one grocery store shopkeeper, two butchers, four shoemakers, four tailors, two blacksmiths, one belt maker, ten joiners, one tinner, two millers, two pharmacist, and two physicians.  Fr. Vrana, a notary public, has a bookstore, insurance, and passage agency.  There are three Czech organizations: a theatre society “Thalia”, a supporting society Č.S.P.S., Lodge “Jan Amos Komensky”, and a church society, the Society of St. Vaclav.  The church of St. Vaclav is administered by P. Roman Knemmel, and has 300 churchgoers.  The earliest Czech settlers here were Martin Barek, Fr. Brozek, Mar. Herman, and Vojt. Vrtos.  The number of Czechs here is still increasing. If a Czech school could be established here, then, too, Czech social life would also flourish.”

Join us tomorrow as we continue across Minnesota in search of 1878 Czech immigrant communities!

Onward To Our Past®

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Good morning and welcome to today’s installment of our exclusive translation of the 1878 census of Czech settlements across America, which was undertaken by the Czech-American genealogy mother lode of the annual journal Amerikán Národní Kalendář. 

We began this exclusive translation from 1878 with a primer on the world as it was in 1878.  Then in Installment#1 we ‘visited’ the states of Arkansas and California.  In Installment #2 it was on to Connecticut and the Dakota Territory.  In Installment #3 we began our tour of rural Illinois and Installment #4 concluded this tour of Illinois and we moved on to Iowa.  Installment #5 we continued with our travels in Iowa.  Installment #6 featured more towns and rural Czech communities in Iowa as did Installment #7 and Installment #8Installment #9 saw us complete the state of Iowa as well as begin our tour of the great state of Kansas.  Installment #10 included seven new Czech communities in Kansas and Installment #11 finished Kansas, included Massachusetts, and began Michigan.  Installment #12 featured six communities in Michigan, while Installment #13 finished Michigan with four communities and began the first two communities in Minnesota.  Click on any of the links and you can catch up if  you missed portion of this wonderful Czech genealogy and history article.

Today we continue across the North Star State with five new Czech communities in 1878.

Enjoy!

Amerikán Národní Kalendář

Volume: II, Year: 1878, Pages: 97-108

STRUČNÁ STATISTIKA: Osad, míst a okresů ve Spojených Státech Čechy obydlených (Jak daleko nám bylo možno letos dopátrati se dál. Budoucího roku budeme pokračovat)

 BRIEF STATISTICS: Of settlements, towns and counties at United States, inhabited by Czechs (As far as we were able to find this year. Next year we will continue)

1878 Vikings small jpeg

Heidelberg, LeSueur County, has in its surrounding area, mainly in the town of Lanesburgh, one hundred seventy-seven farmers, one blacksmith, one belt maker, two joiners, one shoemaker, and one tailor.  Among the first Czechs who settled here was Ant. Rynda from Zablati near Budejovice, who came here in September 1856.  Since that time about 15-20 new Czech families arrive each year.  There is a Czech church by the name of St. Scholastica.  P. Roman Kimmel serves as its parson and its congregation counts 52 families.  There is also the St. Vaclav Society, for supporting those who fall to illness, located in Montgomery, but it also has several members here.  There is no Czech school, but we hope that one will be built sometime soon.

Jordan, Scott County, has in its surrounding area four settlements, which are inhabited by 43 Slavic Czech families. Namely: Jordan with twenty-six families.  In a rural area four miles from Jordan live ten families, in Helena live six families, and in Saint Joe lives one family.

In Jordan there is one physician (Dr. Habenicht), two innkeepers, one baker, one bricklayer, three tailors, one shoemaker, and the rest of the Czechs are farmers.  The first Czechs who settled here were Josef and Frant. Vosynek in 1857 along with Jan Pilny.  There is no Czech school, nor Czech church, nor Czech organization.  Only a few of the locals subscribe to any magazines.  Most of them say “we grew up without any magazines and we can live without them still”.  There needs to be some patriot here to work on changing the minds of the people and to encourage them to care about progress and education, because without it we will have no future in America. We will hope this changes.

Minnesota Lake, Faribault County, has among its forty families three Czech farmers, one joiner, and one saddle maker.  On 30 June, two Czechs left their homes here for Nebraska.  The earliest Czech settler here was Kaspar Penhajter, who arrived in 1864 and then Alb. Krejci, who has been here since 1865.

Long Prairie, Todd County, has two Czech farmers living among twenty-seven families of other ethnic origins.

Maple Lake, Buffalo County, has thirteen Czech families.  The earliest Czech arrival was Mart. Kotilinek who settled here in 1861.  All of the Czechs here are farmers.”

Tomorrow we will continue with our ‘tour’ of Minnesota Czech communities in 1878!

Onward To Our Past®

 

 

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Welcome back!  Today we continuing our tour through the United States and the Czech communities that existed in 1878.  This census of sorts was conducted by the Czech-American annual journal Amerikán Národní Kalendář.  The was the best known of all the Czech-American publications as it ran for 59 years.

As  you may know, we began this exclusive translation from 1878 with a primer on the world as it was in 1878.  Then in Installment#1 we ‘visited’ the states of Arkansas and California.  In Installment #2 it was on to Connecticut and the Dakota Territory.  In Installment #3 we began our tour of rural Illinois and Installment #4 concluded this tour of Illinois and we moved on to Iowa.  Installment #5 we continued with our travels in Iowa.  Installment #6 featured more towns and rural Czech communities in Iowa as did Installment #7 and Installment #8Installment #9 saw us complete the state of Iowa as well as begin our tour of the great state of Kansas.  Installment #10 included seven new Czech communities in Kansas and Installment #11 finished Kansas, included Massachusetts, and began Michigan.  Installment #12 featured six communities in Michigan.  Click on any of the links and you can catch up if  you missed portion of this wonderful Czech genealogy and history article.

Today we complete Michigan and begin our tour of the North Star State, Minnesota.

Enjoy!

Amerikán Národní Kalendář

Volume: II, Year: 1878, Pages: 97-108

 STRUČNÁ STATISTIKA: Osad, míst a okresů ve Spojených Státech Čechy obydlených (Jak daleko nám bylo možno letos dopátrati se dál. Budoucího roku budeme pokračovat)
 BRIEF STATISTICS: Of settlements, towns and counties at United States, inhabited by Czechs (As far as we were able to find this year. Next year we will continue.)
Michigan

Michigan

“Niles, Berrien County, among its 5,500 dwellers has only one Czech family, that of Mr. Jos. Skala, who, with his 6 children, who arrived and settled here in 1854.

Petersburgh, Monroe County, has among its 700 inhabitants two Czech families, who are both farmers. Jos. Haman arrived here in 1866. Jos.Svehla along with Frant. Svehla arrived later in 1873. Another Czech who lived here sold his properties and moved further out west.

Traverse City, Traverse County, has 1,800 dwellers and among them live 60 Czechs. Some of these Czechs have their own businesses: there is one tailor company “Red Star” of Vilem, Oliva, and Company with 6 workers; one paint works for wagons and coaches, one grocery store, four inns, two brewers, one butcher, four shoemakers, and two joiners. Czech social life is very strong here, especially for the Freethinkers, because there is a “Svobodna Obec” Society with sixteen members who are Czech patriots. Three times a year they host Czech celebrations and dances and balls. The first Czechs arrived here in 1857. They were Fr. Kratochvil, Ant. and Jos. Wilhelm, Jos. Kyselka, and Fr. Lada. The number of Czechs is continuing to increase at this time.

Ypsilanti, Washtenaw County, has about 6,000 inhabitants of which six are Czech families. As to who was the first Czech settled here it was Vac. Dusek in 1866 who had lived from 1854 in Canada and later in Detroit. Two of his sons fought in the last war and the older one was killed, there. V. Dusek is a joiner. In 1871 arrived here Ant. Vacha, a shoemaker with three sons, two of them are married. Next came Fr. Marik and Jos. Klika, both in 1874. Four of the Czechs work in the paper-mill.

1878 Minnesota map no words jpeg small

Minnesota

Minnesota

Chatfield, Fillmore County, has among its 1,400 inhabitants, twenty Czechs families, who began to move here in the years 1855 to 1857.  Still more Czechs continue to settle in this area at this time.  The first Czechs were: Fr. Andrlik, Fr. Pavelka, Fr. Jelinek, Jan Cermak, Fr. Setka, Jos. Kadlec, Ant. Stransky and Fr. Novotný.  Fifteen of the local Czechs are farmers and there are two joiners, one brewer, one bricklayer, one carpenter, and one grocery store shopkeeper.

Hart Township, Winona County, has 186 Czechs.  Namely 73 adults and 113 children.  Among them are also four Czech ladies who married Germans.  They have 26 children all together and all of them speak Czech.  All of the Czechs are farmers who also know some craft and they use it as their second occupation.  There are 31 farm owners and together they own 3,900 acres.  There are also one brewer (Jakub Pfeifer in Rushford), two joiners, three tailors, one blacksmith, and one shoemaker.  The first Czechs settled here in 1859 and they were Jan Fr. Steinbauer with his family, from Trhove Sviny, Budejovice kraj, Bohemia.  The number of Czechs is increasing still at this time.”

Stay with us as we continue our tour of 1878 Czech settlements across America tomorrow!

Onward To Our Past®

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Welcome to Onward To Our Past’s exclusive English translation of the wonderful Czech genealogy article from the 1878 edition of Amerikán Národní Kalendář titled “STRUČNÁ STATISTIKA: Osad, míst a okresů ve Spojených Státech Čechy obydlených (Jak daleko nám bylo možno letos dopátrati se dál. Budoucího roku budeme pokračovat)” translated as “BRIEF STATISTICS: Of settlements, towns and counties at United States, inhabited by Czechs (As far as we were able to find this year. Next year we will continue.)”

Today we take you further afield in the state of Michigan to the City of Detroit and five additional, smaller communities across the state as Amerikán Národní Kalendář attempted to conduct a census of the Czech immigrants and their communities all across America in 1878.  We might add the fact is they did a tremendous job!

As  you may know, we began this exclusive translation from 1878 with a primer on the world as it was in 1878.  Then in Installment#1 we ‘visited’ the states of Arkansas and California.  In Installment #2 it was on to Connecticut and the Dakota Territory.  In Installment #3 we began our tour of rural Illinois and Installment #4 concluded this tour of Illinois and we moved on to Iowa.  Installment #5 we continued with our travels in Iowa.  Installment #6 featured more towns and rural Czech communities in Iowa as did Installment #7 and Installment #8Installment #9 saw us complete the state of Iowa as well as begin our tour of the great state of Kansas.  Installment #10 included seven new Czech communities in Kansas and Installment #11 finished Kansas, included Massachusetts, and began Michigan.  Click on any of the links and you can catch up if  you missed portion of this wonderful Czech genealogy and history article.

Enjoy!

Amerikán Národní Kalendář

Volume: II, Year: 1878, Pages: 97-108

STRUČNÁ STATISTIKA: Osad, míst a okresů ve Spojených Státech Čechy obydlených (Jak daleko nám bylo možno letos dopátrati se dál. Budoucího roku budeme pokračovat)

 BRIEF STATISTICS: Of settlements, towns and counties at United States, inhabited by Czechs (As far as we were able to find this year. Next year we will continue.)

Detroit, Michigan

Detroit, Michigan

“Detroit, Wayne County, the largest city in Michigan, has 115,000 inhabitants.  One thousand five hundred of them are Czechs.  They first began to settle here in 1853 and the very first Czechs in the area were Pospisil, Hudila, A. Bauer, Jan Hropik, Ig. Melzer, V. Hess, Hulanek, V. Kulicek, Jos. Nosek, Jefitovsky, Ant. Cinadr, Fr. Herman, Simon, Hosna, Nemecek, and V. Bluma.  The number of settlers is increasing since the time of these first settlers.  Czechs prosper well here: 52 of them have their own business here, namely: two grocery store shopkeepers, thirteen innkeepers, one dry goods shopkeeper, six butchers, three shoemakers, two tailors, one joiner, one tinner, one painter (fresco), one portrait-painter, one clockmaker and goldsmith, and nineteen farmers.  The religious life of Czechs is administrated by St. Vaclav Church.  Its parson is Mr. P. Frant. Tichy.  The church is attended by 32 families.  There is not any Czech school here yet, but we hope that will be established soon.  Czech social life is represented by eight organizations.  Their names are: Slovanska Lipa, Budivoj, Svornost, Č.S.P.S. Lodge number 5 “Havlicek”, The Catholic Society of St. Vaclav, a Singing Society, Sokol, and two workers’ unions.  Czech theatre performances are played here about three times per a year, trips are organized four times per a year and dancing balls are held very often.

michigan-county-map

East Saginaw, Saginaw County, has among its 19,000 dwellers, 322 Czechs.  Eight of them are farmers, one innkeeper and two shoemakers. The very first Czech here was Fr. Kafka, who settled here in 1856. Very good works are done by the only Czech organization here, the “Readers Society”.  It serves not only as an education organization for adults, but also provides opportunities for children to learn to read, to sing, and to count at Sunday school.  Meetings of this Society are taking place at house of Mr. Vanek.

Fayette, Delta County, has among its 300 dwellers, four Czech families.  One is a railway engineer and the rest of the Czechs work at a smelting factory.  The whole area is the property of the railway.  The very first Czech who settled here was Mr. A. Benysek in 1869.

Good Harbor, Leelanau County, has in its surrounding area 26 Czech families.  All of them are farmers, with exception of Jan Krubner, who is a carpet-maker.  He was the first Czech here and arrived in 1855.  The same year he was followed Ant. Kucera, Karel Vyskocil, Fr. Krajc, V. Musil, F. Musil, Jos. Krubner, and Jan Kulanda.

Leland, Leelanau County, has in the surrounding area 26 Czech families. All of them are farmers, but now one lives at Chicago and another one now lives in Detroit. There is almost no Czech social life here.  However, some of the Czech citizens try by their personal example to encourage rest to avoid assimilation.

Menomonee, in the county of the same name, has among its 2,000 dwellers two Czech families, and approximately twenty young workers, who after the season ends in the winter usually move out.  The first Czech here was Mr. Vaněk, who works as a saddle maker and has been here since 1876.”

Michigan

Michigan

Join us tomorrow as we continue across America finding all the Czech communities from 1878!

Onward To Our Past®

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Onward To Our Past® Genealogy and History Company is pleased to bring you our newest installment of our exclusive translation of the 1878 Czech community census taken by the editors of the Czech-American annual journal, Amerikán Národní Kalendář.  Today we visit new Czech communities in Kansas, move on to the Czech communities in Massachusetts, and then begin our ‘tour’ of the Czech communities in Michigan.

We began with a primer on the world as it was in 1878.  Then in Installment#1 we ‘visited’ the states of Arkansas and California.  In Installment #2 it was on to Connecticut and the Dakota Territory.  In Installment #3 we began our tour of rural Illinois and Installment #4 concluded this tour of Illinois and we moved on to Iowa.  Installment #5 we continued with our travels in Iowa.  Installment #6 featured more towns and rural Czech communities in Iowa as did Installment #7 and Installment #8Installment #9 saw us complete the state of Iowa as well as begin our tour of the great state of Kansas.  Installment #10 included seven new Czech communities in Kansas.  Click on any of the links and you can catch up if  you missed portion of this wonderful Czech genealogy and history article.

Enjoy today’s journey as we visit Czechs in Kansas, Massachusetts, and Michigan!

Amerikán Národní Kalendář

Volume: II, Year: 1878, Pages: 97-108

STRUČNÁ STATISTIKA: Osad, míst a okresů ve Spojených Státech Čechy obydlených (Jak daleko nám bylo možno letos dopátrati se dál. Budoucího roku budeme pokračovat)

BRIEF STATISTICS: Of settlements, towns and counties at United States, inhabited by Czechs (As far as we were able to find this year. Next year we will continue.)

Kansas state in US jpeg small

Click for full image.

“Sumava, Ottawa County (Americans call this town Bohemian Creek) is a town established by the Czechs, and has about twenty-one families totaling 60 persons. Among them live 16 children attending school.  Most of the Czechs are Freethinkers, free of any church.  All of them are farmers who worked as craftsmen before.  However, only four of them still have their craft as their second occupations.  There are one shoemaker, one tailor, one blacksmith, and one joiner.  All of them are pioneers who began settling here in 1874.  Among the first ones were: A. Kosar, M Sledar, F. Bunderle (from Alleghany, who left again).  Next was J. Cerny, J. Antene, and others.  The number of settlers is still increasing.

Wilson, Ellsworth County, has among its 124 dwellers seventy Slavic Czechs.  Sixty-six of them are farmers.  There are also two grocery store shopkeepers, two dry goods store shopkeepers, one land-surveyor and engineer, four musicians, two brewers, two shoemakers, two tailors, one blacksmith, two joiners, four bricklayers, and two carpenters.  The Czechs established a Czech English school here, where Mr. F.J. Svehla works as the teacher for about 15 children.  There is also a Czech commercial society named “Blahobyt”.  The town was established by F.J. Svehla in 1874 and its great location attracts a lot of new immigrants here.

1878 Massachusetts map

Massachusetts map. Click for full image.

Massachusetts:

Boston has a large number of Czechs, but we did not received any details about them this year.  We will report about this next year (Ed: 1879).

Easthampton, has also several Czech families, but we have not received any information about them either.

Haydenville, Williamsburg County, has among its 800 dwellers only one Czech, Mr. Matous Duchoslav, who has lived here since April of 1876. Another Czech who lived here moved out further to the west.

Somerville, Somerville County, is a town connected with Boston by a bridge.  The town has 20,000 inhabitants and only one Czech house, which is the tailor shop and workshop of Mr. A. J. Hadrbolec.  Another Czech Mr. J. Kulda works for him.  The business was established in 1875.  The wife of Hadrblec is also Czech and their daughter, Bozenka, is being raised as a Czech.

Michigan

Michigan

Michigan:

Adrian, a town with 11,000 dwellers has only two Czech families.  The fathers of these two families are bricklayers.  Mr. Martin Clauda settled here in 1876 and his 2 sons live here too and they are tinners.

Bay City, Bay County has 27,000 inhabitants.  Among them are twenty-seven adult Czechs.  Three of them are farmers, one is an innkeeper, one is a dry goods shopkeeper, one a physician, and one is a miller.  The oldest Czech settler is Fr. Bartovec (who has been here since 1860).  The next oldest one is Vaclav Sykora.  A lot of the Czechs are tied with Germans, in both their social and religious lives, which unfortunately can led to our assimilation.”

Join us tomorrow as we continue our tour of the Czechs in the United States in 1878 as reported by the Czech genealogy treasure-trove of Amerikán Národní Kalendář!

Onward To Our Past®

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Welcome back to Onward To Our Past® and our exclusive translation of the 1878 article “STRUČNÁ STATISTIKA: Osad, míst a okresů ve Spojených Státech Čechy obydlených (Jak daleko nám bylo možno letos dopátrati se dál. Budoucího roku budeme pokračovat)” translated as “BRIEF STATISTICS: Of settlements, towns and counties at United States, inhabited by Czechs (As far as we were able to find this year. Next year we will continue.)”

When we took a brief ‘breather’ on this project we were touring the Czech settlements of the states of Iowa and Kansas.

We began with a primer on the world as it was in 1878.  Then in Installment#1 we ‘visited’ the states of Arkansas and California.  In Installment #2 it was on to Connecticut and the Dakota Territory.  In Installment #3 we began our tour of rural Illinois and Installment #4 concluded this tour of Illinois and we moved on to Iowa.  Installment #5 we continued with our travels in Iowa.  Installment #6 featured more towns and rural Czech communities in Iowa as did Installment #7 and Installment #8Installment #9 saw us complete the state of Iowa as well as begin our tour of the great state of Kansas.  Click on any of the links and you can catch up if  you missed portion of this wonderful Czech genealogy and history article.

We know you will enjoy today’s installment as we take you, courtesy of the Czech genealogy treasure-trove from the annual Czech-American journal Amerikán Národní Kalendář. 

Here we go visiting seven new communities across Kansas!

Amerikán Národní Kalendář

Volume: II, Year: 1878, Pages: 97-108

STRUČNÁ STATISTIKA: Osad, míst a okresů ve Spojených Státech Čechy obydlených (Jak daleko nám bylo možno letos dopátrati se dál. Budoucího roku budeme pokračovat)

BRIEF STATISTICS: Of settlements, towns and counties at United States, inhabited by Czechs (As far as we were able to find this year. Next year we will continue.)

Kansas fields

Severance, Troy County, has about four Czech families among its 500 inhabitants.  All of them are businessmen.  There are an innkeeper, two butchers, and one dry goods storekeeper.  The names of the Czechs are: Jan Holub, Karel Kopec, Jan Marek, and Arnold Adler, who have lived here since 1869.

Blue Rapids, Marshall County, has among its 189 dwellers eleven Czech families, all of who are farmers.  The first Czech arrived here in 1869 and he was named Jan Budka.  More Czechs live in the surrounding area of the county.

Cuba, Republic County, has 160 Czech families, mostly farmers, but some of them are also businessmen, namely: one grocery store shopkeeper, one dry goods shopkeeper, two innkeepers, four shoemakers, three tailors, one belt maker, and fourteen joiners.  The town of New Tabor serves as the center of Czech life in this county (see more).  The very first Czech settlers have been here since 1869 and are Jos. Houdek, J. Pachta, Jos. Mlejnek, Vo. Kasl, J. Loevenburg, Frant. Janasek, and A. Stransky.  The number of settlers is increasing.

Fairview Township, Republic County, has among its 500 dwellers 256 Czechs.  Forty-three families are farmers, while some of them are businessmen, namely: one grocery store shopkeeper, one innkeeper, one dry goods store shopkeeper, two shoemakers, two tailors, one blacksmith, one belt maker, and two joiners.  The very first Czech settlers who have been here since 1869 are: P. Pintner, J. Splichal, G. Shanel, M. Moravek, V. Saip, J. Rundus, Jos. Kucera, V. Sekadlo, and G. Severa.  The Czech social life as well as religious life is concentrated in New Tabor.

Hanover, Washington County, has among its 525 inhabitants, four Czech families, who settled here in 1869, namely: Jan Turek, a grains and wood trader, J. Hora, Fr. Klacan, and Fr. Bestak.  In the surrounding area live 32 farm owners, some of whom also had additional occupations: one wheelwright one brick maker, three shoemakers, one tailor, one joiner, four bricklayers, and one carpenter.  The number of settlers is continuing to increase here.

Jackson Township, McPherson County, has fifteen Czech families.  All of them are farmers and there are two Czech ladies who married Germans who came here from Chicago.  The Czechs started to settle here in 1871 and they were the first ones, because in 1872 their closest neighbors lived 9-15 miles away from them.  Now, however, a lot of newcomers have arrived and the area is quiet populated.  In October 1871, settled here the following Czechs: T. Kucera, Mat. Kubin, and Jos. Kubin.”

Marak, Brown County, is a small town, which received its name from two brothers from Moravia, who settled here about 20 years ago – Jos. and Frant. Marak.  Many more families have settled in the area and all of them are of Moravian origin.  In Marak they have one grocery store, one dry goods store, one shoemaker, two joiners, one tailor, one blacksmith, one belt maker, and one pharmacist.  Plus there are about 45 farmers.  The number of settlers is still increasing now.”

Be sure to join us again tomorrow as we continue with our tour of 1878 Czech communities across America!

Onward To Our Past®

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Czech Genealogy and History: Jan Neruda poem Písně kosmickéhttp://onwardtoourpast.com/czech-language-documents/czech-genealogy-and-history-jan-neruda-poem-pisne-kosmicke.html http://onwardtoourpast.com/czech-language-documents/czech-genealogy-and-history-jan-neruda-poem-pisne-kosmicke.html#comments Tue, 23 Jun 2015 09:09:52 +0000 http://onwardtoourpast.com/?p=5045

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As promised, today we bring you Jan Neruda’s poem Písně kosmické in its original Czech.

Enjoy!

Písně kosmické

by Jan Nepamuk Neruda

Frogs small

“Seděly žáby v kaluži,

hleděly vzhůru k nebi,

starý jim žabák učený

odvíral tvrdé lebi.

 

Vysvětloval jim oblohu,

líűil ty světlé drtky,

mluvil o pánech hvězdářích

zove je “Světa krtky”.

 

Pravil, že jejich hvězdný zkum

zvláštní je mírou veden,

dvacet že milionů mil

teprv jim loket jeden.

 

Tedy že, řekněm pro příklad

– věříme-li v ty krtky -,

k Neptunu třicet loket je,

k Venuši jen tři čtvrtky.

 

Rozmluvil se pak o Slunci

– žáby jsou divem němy -,

ze Slunce ž e by nastrouhal

na tři sta tisíc Zemí.

 

Slunce že velmi slouží nám,

paprskovými klíny

štípajíc věčnost na rok a

směnkové na termíny.

 

O kometách že těžkářeč,

rozhodnout že to nechce,

míní však, že by nemělo

soudit se příliš lehce.

 

Nejsou snad všecky nešťastny,

nejsou snad zhoubny všecky,

o jedné ale vypráví

sám rytíř Luběněcki:

 

sotva se její paprsky

odněkud k nám sem vdraly,

vskutku se v glinské hospodě

hanebně ševci sprali.

 

O hvězdách potom podotknul,

po nebi co jich všude,

skoro že samáslunce jsou,

zelené, modré, rudé.

 

Vezmem-li pak pod spektroskop

paprslek jejich světla,

že v něm naleznem kovy tyž,

z nichžse i Země spletla.

 

Umlknul. Kolem horlivě

šuškají posluchači.

Žabák se ptá, zdaž o světech

ještě cos zvědít ráči.

 

“Jen bychom rády věděly,”

vrch hlavy poulí zraky,

“jsou-li tam tvoři jako my,

jsou-li tam žáby taky!””

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Czech Genealogy and History: Bohemian Poet Jan Neruda Continuedhttp://onwardtoourpast.com/genealogy_blog/czech-genealogy/czech-genealogy-and-history-bohemian-poet-jan-neruda-continued.html http://onwardtoourpast.com/genealogy_blog/czech-genealogy/czech-genealogy-and-history-bohemian-poet-jan-neruda-continued.html#comments Mon, 22 Jun 2015 09:33:05 +0000 http://onwardtoourpast.com/?p=5038

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If you read our story of Jan Neruda, Czech poet and author, you know he was well known and highly regarded in Bohemia and beyond.

While conducting our research on Neruda we came across the English translation of one of his poems that particularly caught our attention.  Why?  This poem, Písně kosmické, was one of the poems taken aboard the Space Shuttle with  U.S. astronaut Dr. Andrew J. Feustel!  You see Dr. Feustel’s mother-in-law is Czech and that influence was so significant on him he took the Czech cartoon character Krtek along for a space shuttle ride as well as Jan Neruda’s poetry.

In 2009 astronaut Feustel took with him into space a copy of a very special Czech book.   On his flight aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis, Feustel not only carried a Czech flag but also a copy of Czech poet Jan Neruda’s book “Cosmic Songs” (Písně kosmické).   If you have ever read #22, “Do Frogs Exist There Too?” you will see why astronaut Feustel picked Neruda’s work to go with him into space.

Here, with the permission of the translator, D.P. Stern, is the English translation of “Písně kosmické”, or “Do Frogs Exist there too?”

It is a wonderful piece of poetry!

Frogs small

Do Frogs Exist there too?

Jan Neuda, 1878

Poem #22 in his book titled “Cosmic Songs” (Písně kosmické)

Translated by D. P. Stern and used with his permission

 

“Frogs sat around a puddle
And gazed at heavens high
Frog teacher pounding into skulls
The science of the sky.

He spoke about the heavens
Bright dots we see there burning
And men watch them, “astronomers”
Like moles they dig for learning.

When these moles start to map the stars
The large becomes quite small
What’s twenty million miles to us
They call one foot, that’s all.

So, as those moles did figure out
(If you believe their plan)
Neptune is thirty feet away
Venus, less than one.

If we chopped up the Sun, he said
(Awed frogs could only stare)
We’d get three hundred thousand Earth’s
With still a few to spare

The Sun helps us make use of time,
It rolls round heaven’s sphere
And cuts a workday into shifts
“Forever” to a year

What comets are is hard to say
A strange manifestation
Though this is not a reason for
Some idle speculation

They are no evil sign, we hope
No reason for great fright
As in a story we got from
Lubyenyetsky, great knight

A comet there appeared, and when
It rays were seen by all
The cobblers in a tavern
Began a shameful brawl

He told them how the stars we see
So many, overhead
Are actually only suns
Some green, some blue, some red

And if we use the spectroscope
Their light tells, in addition
Those distant stars and our Earth
Have the same composition

He stopped. The frogs were overwhelmed.
Their froggy eyeballs rolled.
“What more about this universe
Would you like to be told?”

‘Just one more thing, please tell us sir’
A frog asked, ‘Is it true?
Do creatures live there just like us
Do frogs exist there too?'”

Tomorrow for our Czech speaking fans we will bring you the poem as written in Czech.

Onward To Our Past®

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Czech Genealogy and History: Bohemian Poet Extraordinaire Jan Nepomuk Neruda Installment 2 of 2http://onwardtoourpast.com/ank-article-translations/czech-genealogy-and-history-bohemian-poet-extraordinaire-jan-nepomuk-neruda-installment-2-of-2.html http://onwardtoourpast.com/ank-article-translations/czech-genealogy-and-history-bohemian-poet-extraordinaire-jan-nepomuk-neruda-installment-2-of-2.html#comments Sat, 20 Jun 2015 09:17:58 +0000 http://onwardtoourpast.com/?p=5031

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Czech genealogy and history exclusive right here for you!

The following is the first ever English translation of the article found in the 1892 edition of Amerikán Národní Kalendář.  Brought to you exclusively by Onward To Our Past® and their translation partner for this piece, Ms. Nina Haviernikova of The Ohio State University.

Today’s installment, the second of two, completes this biography of famed Czech poet and author, Jan Nepomuk Neruda.  If you missed installment #1 just click here and catch up!

Enjoy!

Jan Neruda

Renowned Czech Poet

Jan Neruda

“In 1860 he edited a feuilleton of the magazine “Čas” (The Time), but when this periodical moved away from its free-thinking nature, Neruda left for the magazine “Hlas” (The Voice), which later became “Národní Listy” (The National Papers). He stayed with this journal until his last breath and, whenever he could, he entertained and cultivated his readers with his witty, stimulating, and humorous discussions “under the line”.

Week after week Neruda delivered his first-class pieces of exceptional prose full of wit, showing his broad outlook and deep knowledge, as well as ardent love for homeland and humankind, for freedom and ideals. Neruda kept his freshness for years, until the very last stage of his life, when he was burdened by a painful illness that ultimately prevented him from writing.

His first poems were published in Mikovec’s “Lumír” in 1854 under the pseudonym Janko Hovora. He published his first collection of poems, “Hřbitovní kvítí” (Cemetery Flowers), which provoked considerable emotion, four years later.

Later Neruda published his “Books of Verses”, “Ballads and Romances”, “Cosmic Songs”, “Simple Motifs”, and he left a beautiful collection of poems “Friday Songs” unpublished. In prose, he published a collection of short stories “Arabesques”, “Various People”, the brilliant “Tales of the Little Quarter”, “Playful and Fierce Jokes”, “Short and Shorter Studies”, as well as several volumes of his selected feuilletons. Neruda’s works of drama include the successful comedies “A Groom from Hunger”, “Sold Love”, the tragedy “Francesca di Rimini”, among others.

Home of Jan Neruda in Prague.

Home of Jan Neruda in Prague.

In addition, he was a very active and impartial literary and theatre critic.  With this work he served our literature and theater in a great way. Neruda was a traveler as well; he travelled throughout most of Western and Southern Europe. He also visited the East, Palestine and Egypt. These travels resulted in the beautiful collections of short stories “From Minor Travels” and “Pictures from Abroad”.

All of his works are characteristic of his profound, purely Czech compassion. With original themes and relatively original form, Neruda wrote in a realistic style. This style allowed him to achieve great success as a writer, by fittingly linking patriotic and humanistic concerns.”

Neruda Street

Neruda Street

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Another Czech genealogy and history exclusive right here for you!

The following is the first ever English translation of the article found in the 1892 edition of Amerikán Národní Kalendář.  It is brought to you exclusively by Onward To Our Past® and our amazingly talented translation partner for this piece, Ms. Nina Haviernikova of The Ohio State University.

As you know, Czechs have always taken their writers seriously!  If you are not aware of this, click here and read more about this.

Jan Neruda was no exception and actually was at or near the apex of this adoration and attention during his lifetime (1834-1891) and especially after.

Today we invite you to enjoy installment 1 of 2 of this biography of this historic and important Czech!

Jan Neruda

Renowned Czech Poet

Jan Neruda

“The news of the sudden death of the Czech literary community darling, our favorite poet, writer and feuilletonist, caught the whole Czech public in a painful surprise.  Neruda passed away on 22 August of this year in his Vladislavská St. flat in Prague at ten o’clock in the evening.

Only the previous day he had gone for a walk.  However, he complained of internal pain in the morning and he did not live to see the next day.  He was laid to rest beside his friend, poet J.V.Frič at the memorable Vyšehrad on 25 August with a large crowd in attendance.

The grave of Jan Neruda in Prague.

The grave of Jan Neruda in Prague.

The famous poet, who, with the depth of his thoughts, stands alongside the greatest names of the world poetry, was born in Prague’s Malá Strana on 10 July 1834 to a family of little affluence.

Despite his parents’ hardship they encouraged their only son to study. Neruda initially studied in a German school, as that was the only kind of school available at that time. Later he transferred to a newly established “Staroměstské” Gymnasium. His mother wished that he would become a priest. Neruda, however, developed an aversion for this profession, mostly because of his dislike for the catechist Václav Štulc who was also a religious writer. Neruda’s distaste, in fact, become so strong, that he remained free-thinking for the rest of his life. He also detested priests in general and often sharply criticized them throughout his life.

Neruda studied law for two years, and subsequently worked as a clerk. He then went on to study philosophy and for a time worked as a substitute teacher at Realschule[1]. After this period he wholly devoted his life to Czech literature. He was one of the principal founders of the almanac “Máj” (May), published in 1855, which introduced a new direction in Czech literature.

A sample of Jan Neruda's poetry.

A sample of Jan Neruda’s poetry.

In 1860 he edited a feuilleton of the magazine “Čas” (The Time), but when this periodical moved away from its free-thinking nature, Neruda left for the magazine “Hlas” (The Voice), which later became “Národní Listy” (The National Papers).”

[1] The Realschule is a type of secondary school in GermanySwitzerlandLiechtenstein and Estonia. It has also existed in CroatiaAustriaDenmark and NorwaySwedenHungary, Slovenia and in the Russian Empire.

Tomorrow we will complete this 1892 story of Jan Neruda so stay with us right here at Onward To Our Past®

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